Colorado Study of Rocky Flats and Cancer

A study of ten types of cancer in neighborhoods near the now-closed Rocky Flats Plant by the State of Colorado has, according to a Denver post article, “. .  .uncovered no evidence to conclude that contamination from the plant has caused a cancer epidemic.” “Four cancers—lung, esophagus, colorectal and prostate—were more common in some, but not all neighborhoods near Rocky Flats than in the metro area as a whole.” The first three “.  .  .could is explained by higher rates of smoking in those areas.” The elevated prostate numbers in Boulder County were consistent with “.  .  .higher-than-average prostate cancer rates in wealthy areas, possibly the result of better disease screening.  .  .  .” The summary is that the study found “.  .  .the rate of the 10 types of cancer was statistically indistinguishable from the overall city’s rate.  .  .  .”

Reaction to the announcements brought on comments from people representing a group called “Downwinders.” “When you do a ZIP code study of people who live in the place now, you’re not finding the people who might have been affected. .  .  .” This is followed by a comment “.  .  .the studies suffer, though, because they are only able to look at where people were living when they were diagnosed with cancer. People who once lived in the area but moved before being diagnosed with cancer are not included in the study data, while people newly arrived in the area are.”

I interpret the spokespeople for the “Downwinders” are saying they believe people who lived near the plant and moved away are more likely to have developed cancer than the people who continued to live near the Plant? Why would the plant be considered to have created an increased risk of cancer if moving away increased the risk while moving near the plant reduced the risk?

My answer to these curious questions is that there is little if any evidence of risks from living near Rocky Flats. The people who worked there were understandably careful about managing the dangerous chemicals they were processing because they and their families lived nearby. That fact is not important to some. They just want to know when they can get their share of “government” money after the courts determined Rocky Flats should pay damages to some nearby residents despite the fact it did not create a risk to those people but was a “nuisance.”

Controversies about Rocky Flats will continue until the possibility of money from litigation dies up. That will happen when the attention of trial lawyers moves on to more lucrative ventures and when anti-Rocky Flats critics are not longer able to attract unwarranted attention of the media. It amazes me that a place that carefully performed a vital national defense Cold War mission continues to be successfully vilified by those who have apparently have forgotten what was happening in the world when the decision was made to build the plant. I continue working on a book that I hope will serve as a reminder.

3 thoughts on “Colorado Study of Rocky Flats and Cancer

  1. Hi!
    Sorry for bothering, may be you’re not the right person to ask about it.

    I’m kind of puzzled: where was the famous photo of encirclement (10/15/83) taken from? I mean the photo, for example, at
    https://static.arvadacenter.org/docs/RockyFlats_slideshowTN_600-1-201402171209.jpg

    Geography was my first passion, though I haven’t practice much in geolocation. The only place I could suggest is by CO-128 around the Rock Creek valley. But the terrain is slightly different, and there’s no high voltage poles currently.
    No mountains on the horizon.

    I’m really puzzled… 🙂

    • I think the photo was taken from or near Highway 28 near the intersection of Indiana looking mostly south. I think the draw about in the middle is the Walnut Creek drainage from the Rocky Flats Plant, that is to the left. I hope I’m right. You are welcome to email me at fdsmhobbs@aol.com if I can help further.

      • I made a significant error in my reply. The plant is to the right of the protestors. I’m not certain what I was thinking.

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